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News from February 2017

scientists discover precise DNA sequence code critical for turning genes on

Wednesday, 1 February 2017 by System Administrator

Scientists discover precise DNA sequence code critical for turning genes on

Geneticists solve a decades-long puzzle about how genes are turned on to make cellular proteins

January 27, 2017

 

DNA sequence signal for the activation of human genes. Each tiny human cell contains about six feet of DNA, a double-helical molecular chain containing four types of several billion chemical nucleotides — adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T) — arranged in a specific sequence, or code, that when transcribed guide the cell into producing specific proteins. (credit: University of California — San Diego)

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Synthetic stem cells offer nenefits of natural stem cells without the risk

Wednesday, 1 February 2017 by System Administrator

Synthetic stem cells offer benefits of natural stem cells without the risks

Can be applied to multiple stem cell types and to repair of various organ systems

January 13, 2017

 

A synthetic cardiac stem cell (left) mirroring a real cardiac stem cell (right), offering therapeutic benefits without the associated risks (credit: Alice Harvey/NC State University)

Scientists have created the first synthetic version of a cardiac stem cell, offering therapeutic benefits comparable to those from natural stem cells — but without the risks and limitations, according to researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University in China.

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Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick

Wednesday, 1 February 2017 by System Administrator

Wearable sensors can alert you when you are getting sick, Stanford study shows

January 18, 2017

 

Current versions of three of the devices used for heart-rate and peripheral capillary oxygen saturation measurements in the study (credits left to right: Scanadu, iHealth, and Masimo)

Fitness monitors and other wearable biosensors can tell when your heart rate, activity, skin temperature, and other measures are abnormal, suggesting possible illness, including the onset of infection, inflammation, and even insulin resistance, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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