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The Cryonics Institutes 164th Patient

Friday, 23 March 2018 by System Administrator

Cryonics Institute Case Report for Patient Number 164

 

CI patient #164 was a 58 year old male from Michigan.  The patient was a CI member at the time of his death.  CI staff met with the patient and his family in the weeks leading up to the cryopreservation of the patient, in order to make sure they were as well prepared as they could possibly be.

 

The patient died at home under hospice care at 10:30 pm on March 13, 2018. After the patient was pronounced, the family immediately cooled his head with small bags of ice carefully placed around his head.   Heparin was injected and chest compressions were performed for five minutes. CI staff arrived at the home and added more ice to the patient to facilitate further cooling. The patient was then quickly transferred to the CI facility.  

 

Upon the patient’s arrival at the CI facility, he was transferred to the operating table in the perfusion room and was immediately covered with more ice. Cold water was circulated over the patient’s head to facilitate further and faster cooling.  The nasal temperature upon his arrival was 26.3c, though it quickly came down as the cold water was circulated over his head.  

 

Hillary Martenson performed the perfusion.  The perfusion was completed at 2:15am.  During the perfusion there were 8 liters of 10% Eg solution and 8 liters of 30% Eg solution used, and 65 liters of 70% VM1 solutions used.  The final refractive index of the effluents exiting the right jugular vein was 1.4230.  The final refractive index of the effluents exiting the left jugular vein was 1.4229. The average perfusion pressure was held at 115mm and metal cannulas were used.  Flow rate started at 2.8 liters per minute and was reduced to 0.99 liters per minute by the end of the perfusion. The nasal temperature was -14.5c at the end of the perfusion. 

 

There were no blood clots noted during the perfusion and there was good flow from both of the jugular veins. The entire body was perfused and dehydration and bronzing of the skin was visible through the trunk and on all extremities. Significant dehydration of the head and face was noted along with a bronzing of the skin. No edema or swelling was noted. The perfusion of both the head and body was very successful. 

 

The patient was then transferred to the computer controlled cooling chamber to cool to liquid nitrogen temperature.  The human vitrification program was selected and the time needed to cool the patient to liquid nitrogen temperature was six days and 9 hours.  The patient was then placed in a cryostat for long-term cryonic storage. 

The Cryonics Institutes 163rd Patient

Thursday, 22 February 2018 by System Administrator

Cryonics Institute Case Report for Patient Number 163

 

CI patient #163 was a 71 year old male from New York.  The patient was a CI member at the time of his death.

 

The patient died in the hospital during the early morning hours of February 12, 2018. After the patient was pronounced dead, the contracted funeral home cooled him with ice and brought him to the funeral home. He remained in ice and refrigeration while the paperwork needed for transportation was obtained. 

 

The patient arrived at the CI facility, in ice, at approximately 11:00 pm on the 13th of February, approximately 41 hours after death. The nasal temperature upon his arrival was 7c. 

 

Hillary Martenson performed the perfusion.  During the perfusion there were 3 liters of 30% Eg solution used and 7 liters of 70% VM1 solution used. The final refractive index of the effluents exiting the left jugular vein was 1.4135. It was very difficult to obtain a definitive reading from the right jugular vein. The average perfusion pressure was held at 125mm and metal cannulas were used in each carotid artery.  Flow rate started at 0.72 liters per minute and was reduced to 0.32 liters per minute by the end of the perfusion. The nasal temperature was 1.6c at the end of the perfusion. 

 

Due to the condition of the patient’s body upon arrival, including pitting edema in the extremities, the decision was made to perfuse just the patient’s head. Dehydration and bronzing of the skin were visible on the face and head during the majority of the perfusion. The perfusion was halted at 1:15 am when the eyes, lips, and cheeks of the patient began swelling and the refractive index was no longer increasing. It was decided that continuing the perfusion would have only caused more swelling and would not have been beneficial to the patient.  

 

The patient was then transferred to the computer controlled cooling chamber to cool to liquid nitrogen temperature.  The human vitrification program was selected and the time needed to cool the patient to liquid nitrogen temperature was five days and 11 hours.  The patient was then placed in a cryostat for long-term cryonic storage. 

The Cryonics Institutes 162nd Patient

Sunday, 4 February 2018 by System Administrator

 
 
Cryonics Institute Case Report for Patient Number 162
 
CI patient #162 was a 76 year old male from Toronto. The patient was not a CI member
at the time of his death.
 
The patient was pronounced dead at the hospital on October 11, 2017. The patient’s next
of kin contacted CI after the death had already occurred and instructions were given for
how to make him a patient at CI. The CI protocol for post-mortem non members was
followed. The next of kin contracted with a local funeral home to pack him in dry ice and
store him for the minimum two week period while the contracts and funding were
organized. A perfusion was not able to be performed due to these circumstances.
 
 
The patient arrived at the CI facility, in dry ice, on December 24th, approximately ten
weeks after death. The patient was then placed into the computer controlled cooling
chamber to cool to liquid nitrogen temperature. The human cooling program from dry
ice was selected and the time needed to cool the patient to liquid nitrogen temperature
was 24 hours. The patient was then placed in a cryostat for long-term cryonic storage.
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